Occupational Employment and Wages in State and Local Government : Spotlight on Statistics: U.S – Bureau of Labor Statistics

An official website of the United States government
The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites often end in .gov or .mil. Before sharing sensitive information, make sure you’re on a federal government site.
The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.
Audrey Watson
During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, job losses in large private sector industries such as food services and drinking places received a lot of attention. State and local government also had high job losses. From March 2020 to March 2021, employment fell by 5.1 percent in state government and 6.5 percent in local government, compared with a 4.3-percent decrease in the private sector. The types of jobs in state and local government differ from those in the private sector, as do wages. This Spotlight on Statistics compares the occupational mix and wages in the private sector, state government, and local government.
Private sector
Office and administrative support
Sales and related
Transportation and material moving
Food preparation and serving related
Production
State government
Educational instruction and library
Office and administrative support
Business and financial operations
Protective service
Healthcare practitioners and technical
Local government
Educational instruction and library
Office and administrative support
Protective service
Healthcare practitioners and technical
Management
There were nearly 118 million private sector jobs in May 2020, representing 85 percent of U.S. employment. State government had 4.6 million jobs (3.3 percent) and local government had 14.1 million jobs (10.1 percent). Office and administrative support (15.5 million), sales and related (13.0 million), and transportation and material moving (11.5 million) were the largest occupational groups in the private sector. Educational instruction and library was the largest occupational group in both state government (917,480) and local government (5.3 million), followed by office and administrative support (703,020 in state government and 1.6 million in local government). Protective service was the third-largest occupational group in local government with 1.5 million jobs and was among the largest occupational groups in state government (416,640) in May 2020.
Management
Business and financial operations
Computer and mathematical
Architecture and engineering
Life, physical, and social science
Community and social service
Legal
Educational instruction and library
Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media
Healthcare practitioners and technical
Healthcare support
Protective service
Food preparation and serving related
Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance
Personal care and service
Sales and related
Office and administrative support
Farming, fishing, and forestry
Construction and extraction
Installation, maintenance, and repair
Production
Transportation and material moving
Educational instruction and library occupations made up 20 percent of state government employment and nearly 38 percent of local government employment, compared with less than 2 percent of private sector employment. State and local government also had higher shares of protective service and community and social service occupations than the private sector in May 2020. Sales and related, food preparation and serving related, production, and transportation and material moving occupations accounted for a greater proportion of employment in the private sector than in state and local government. Life, physical, and social science occupations made up less than 1 percent of jobs in the private sector, but nearly 4 percent of employment in state government.
All occupations
Management
Business and financial operations
Computer and mathematical
Architecture and engineering
Life, physical, and social science
Community and social service
Legal
Educational instruction and library
Arts, design, entertainment, sports, and media
Healthcare practitioners and technical
Healthcare support
Protective service
Food preparation and serving related
Building and grounds cleaning and maintenance
Personal care and service
Sales and related
Office and administrative support
Farming, fishing, and forestry
Construction and extraction
Installation, maintenance, and repair
Production
Transportation and material moving
In May 2020, annual mean wages were $9,980 higher in state government than in the private sector, while annual mean wages in local government were $1,980 above the private sector. The higher average wage in state and local government largely reflects differences in the occupational mix, including higher shares of occupations that typically require postsecondary education for entry, rather than higher wages for individual occupations. Compared with the private sector, state and local government had lower mean wages for high-paying occupational groups such as management, legal, and computer and mathematical occupations, and also smaller employment shares of low-paying groups such as food preparation and serving related and healthcare support occupations.
Wage differences for the groups also reflect differences in the mix of detailed occupations within the group. For example, higher wages for protective service occupations in state and local government can be attributed to the fact that law enforcement workers made up the majority of protective service employment in the public sector, while security guards made up three-quarters of protective service employment in the private sector. The large wage difference for educational instruction and library occupations in state government reflects the fact that state government had a much higher share of postsecondary teachers.

Retail salespersons
Fast food and counter workers
Cashiers
Home health and personal care aides
Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand
Customer service representatives
Registered nurses
Office clerks, general
General and operations managers
Stockers and order fillers
Retail salespersons (3.6 million) was the largest occupation in the private sector in May 2020, followed by fast food and counter workers (3.3 million), cashiers (3.3 million), and home health and personal care aides (3.2 million). The 10 largest private sector occupations made up nearly a quarter of total employment in the private sector. Only 2 of the 10—registered nurses and general and operations managers—had annual mean wages above the U.S. average of $56,310; these are also the only two that typically require postsecondary education for entry.

Correctional officers and jailers
Office clerks, general
Registered nurses
Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical, and executive
Teaching assistants, postsecondary
Project management specialists and business operations specialists, all other
Health specialties teachers, postsecondary
Child, family, and school social workers
Police and sheriff’s patrol officers
Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners
Correctional officers and jailers (210,500) was the largest occupation in state government in May 2020. The largest state government occupations also included two related to postsecondary education—postsecondary teaching assistants (107,370) and postsecondary health specialties teachers (96,560)—as well as child, family, and school social workers (72,420) and police and sheriff’s patrol officers (71,010). Similar to the private sector, the 10 largest state government occupations made up about 25 percent of total state government employment. Four of the 10 largest state government occupations had above-average wages: postsecondary health specialties teachers (which typically requires a doctoral or professional degree for entry); registered nurses and project management specialists and business operations specialists, all other (both typically requiring a bachelor’s degree); and police and sheriff’s patrol officers (which typically require a high school diploma or equivalent).

Elementary school teachers, except special education
Teaching assistants, except postsecondary
Secondary school teachers, except special and career/technical education
Police and sheriff’s patrol officers
Middle school teachers, except special and career/technical education
Substitute teachers, short-term
Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners
Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical, and executive
Office clerks, general
Firefighters
The largest occupations in local government were dominated by teachers and teaching assistants in May 2020. Elementary school teachers, except special education (1.2 million) was the largest occupation in local government, followed by teaching assistants, except postsecondary (986,790) and secondary school teachers, except special and career/technical education (850,200). Police and sheriff’s patrol officers (563,940) was the largest local government occupation not related to education. The 10 occupations shown made up 42 percent of local government employment. Five of the 10 had mean wages above the U.S. average of $56,310, including elementary, middle, and secondary school teachers (which typically require a bachelor’s degree for entry); firefighters (which typically require a postsecondary nondegree award); and police and sheriff’s patrol officers.
Fish and game wardens
Forestry and conservation science teachers, postsecondary
Agricultural sciences teachers, postsecondary
Teaching assistants, postsecondary
Geography teachers, postsecondary
Farm and home management educators
First-line supervisors of correctional officers
Library science teachers, postsecondary
Family and consumer sciences teachers, postsecondary
Environmental science teachers, postsecondary
All occupations
Although state government made up only about 3 percent of overall employment, it accounted for the majority of jobs in some occupations. In May 2020, 93.2 percent of fish and game wardens, 82.0 percent of forest and conservation science postsecondary teachers, and 80.1 percent of agricultural sciences teachers were employed in state government. Several other postsecondary teaching occupations were concentrated mainly in state government, including postsecondary teaching assistants (77.4 percent), postsecondary geography teachers (71.3 percent), and postsecondary library science teachers (66.3 percent). Farm and home management educators (68.4 percent) and first-line supervisors of correctional officers (66.9 percent) were also found primarily in state government.
Special education teachers, middle school
First-line supervisors of firefighting and prevention workers
Legislators
Career/technical education teachers, middle school
Career/technical education teachers, secondary school
Special education teachers, kindergarten and elementary school
Firefighters
Animal control workers
Middle school teachers, except special and career/technical education
Special education teachers, secondary school
All occupations
Special education and career/technical education teachers dominated the list of occupations most concentrated in local government. In May 2020, 93.9 percent of middle school special education teachers, 89.7 percent of kindergarten and elementary school special education teachers, and 88.2 percent of secondary school special education teachers were employed in local government. Local government also accounted for over 90 percent of middle and secondary school career/technical education teachers. Aside from teaching occupations, the occupations most concentrated in local government included first-line supervisors of firefighting and prevention workers (92.2 percent), legislators (92.1 percent), and firefighters (89.1 percent).
Surgeons, except ophthalmologists
Physicians, all other; and ophthalmologists, except pediatric
Family medicine physicians
Psychiatrists
General internal medicine physicians
Chief executives
Nurse anesthetists
Dentists, general
Computer and information systems managers
Architectural and engineering managers
Lawyers
Marketing managers
Financial managers
Physicists
Computer and information research scientists
Law teachers, postsecondary
Public relations and fundraising managers
Human resources managers
Economics teachers, postsecondary
Purchasing managers
Physical scientists, all other
Economists
Training and development managers
Personal service managers, all other; entertainment and recreation managers, except gambling; and managers, all other
General and operations managers
Health specialties teachers, postsecondary
Pharmacists
Engineering teachers, postsecondary
Computer network architects
Medical and health services managers
Architecture teachers, postsecondary
Geoscientists, except hydrologists and geographers
Political science teachers, postsecondary
Physician assistants
Education administrators, postsecondary
Software developers and software quality assurance analysts and testers
Nurse practitioners
Atmospheric, earth, marine, and space sciences teachers, postsecondary
Administrative services and facilities managers
Anthropology and archeology teachers, postsecondary
Business teachers, postsecondary
Veterinarians
Information security analysts
Biological science teachers, postsecondary
Construction managers
Data scientists and mathematical science occupations, all other
Electrical engineers
Physics teachers, postsecondary
Transportation, storage, and distribution managers
Medical scientists, except epidemiologists
Computer science teachers, postsecondary
Life scientists, all other
Engineers, all other
Psychologists, all other
Database administrators and architects
Hydrologists
Emergency management directors
Management analysts
Epidemiologists
Computer systems analysts
Environmental science teachers, postsecondary
Financial and investment analysts, financial risk specialists, and financial specialists, all other
Education administrators, kindergarten through secondary
Environmental engineers
Statisticians
Health and safety engineers, except mining safety engineers and inspectors
Producers and directors
Computer programmers
Chemistry teachers, postsecondary
Area, ethnic, and cultural studies teachers, postsecondary
Civil engineers
Clinical, counseling, and school psychologists
Computer occupations, all other
Mechanical engineers
History teachers, postsecondary
Operations research analysts
Microbiologists
Social scientists and related workers, all other
Nursing instructors and teachers, postsecondary
Physical therapists
Psychology teachers, postsecondary
Mathematical science teachers, postsecondary
Network and computer systems administrators
Sociology teachers, postsecondary
Art, drama, and music teachers, postsecondary
Financial examiners
Architects, except landscape and naval
Philosophy and religion teachers, postsecondary
Occupational therapists
Speech-language pathologists
First-line supervisors of police and detectives
Education administrators, all other
Acupuncturists and healthcare diagnosing or treating practitioners, all other
Web developers and digital interface designers
Urban and regional planners
Project management specialists and business operations specialists, all other
Chemists
Budget analysts
Communications teachers, postsecondary
Environmental scientists and specialists, including health
English language and literature teachers, postsecondary
Power plant operators
Accountants and auditors
Social sciences teachers, postsecondary, all other
Social work teachers, postsecondary
Registered nurses
Foreign language and literature teachers, postsecondary
Occupational health and safety specialists
Writers and authors
Dental hygienists
Transportation inspectors
Diagnostic medical sonographers
Compliance officers
Loan officers
Soil and plant scientists
Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialists
Labor relations specialists
Education teachers, postsecondary
Editors
Market research analysts and marketing specialists
Conservation scientists
First-line supervisors of construction trades and extraction workers
First-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, and repairers
Property, real estate, and community association managers
Public relations specialists
Computer network support specialists
Social and community service managers
Arbitrators, mediators, and conciliators
Buyers and purchasing agents
Sales representatives of services, except advertising, insurance, financial services, and travel
Foresters
Claims adjusters, examiners, and investigators
Surveyors
Human resources specialists
Property appraisers and assessors
Zoologists and wildlife biologists
Instructional coordinators
Training and development specialists
Survey researchers
Criminal justice and law enforcement teachers, postsecondary
Career/technical education teachers, secondary school
Construction and building inspectors
Stationary engineers and boiler operators
Executive secretaries and executive administrative assistants
Recreation and fitness studies teachers, postsecondary
First-line supervisors of production and operating workers
Electrical and electronic engineering technologists and technicians
Respiratory therapists
Calibration technologists and technicians and engineering technologists and technicians, except drafters, all other
Radiologic technologists and technicians
Fire inspectors and investigators
Dietitians and nutritionists
Special education teachers, all other
Secondary school teachers, except special and career/technical education
Real estate sales agents
Electrical and electronics repairers, commercial and industrial equipment
First-line supervisors of firefighting and prevention workers
Telecommunications equipment installers and repairers, except line installers
First-line supervisors of office and administrative support workers
Curators
Cardiovascular technologists and technicians
Electricians
Career/technical education teachers, postsecondary
Special education teachers, kindergarten and elementary school
Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters
Legal support workers, all other
Food service managers
First-line supervisors of correctional officers
Healthcare social workers
Health education specialists
Special education teachers, secondary school
Private detectives and investigators
Interpreters and translators
Police and sheriff’s patrol officers
Health information technologists, medical registrars, surgical assistants, and healthcare practitioners and technical workers, all other
Archivists
Occupational health and safety technicians
Life, physical, and social science technicians, all other
Graphic designers
Forensic science technicians
Civil engineering technologists and technicians
First-line supervisors of transportation and material moving workers, except aircraft cargo handling supervisors
Operating engineers and other construction equipment operators
Computer user support specialists
Mobile heavy equipment mechanics, except engines
Meeting, convention, and event planners
Clergy
Paralegals and legal assistants
Environmental engineering technologists and technicians
Social science research assistants
Clinical laboratory technologists and technicians
Middle school teachers, except special and career/technical education
Educational, guidance, and career counselors and advisors
Media and communication workers, all other
Elementary school teachers, except special education
Marriage and family therapists
First-line supervisors of farming, fishing, and forestry workers
Carpenters
Audio and video technicians
Chemical technicians
Social workers, all other
Miscellaneous first-line supervisors, protective service workers
Legal secretaries and administrative assistants
First-line supervisors of landscaping, lawn service, and groundskeeping workers
Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers
Mental health and substance abuse social workers
Surgical technologists
Production, planning, and expediting clerks
Adult basic education, adult secondary education, and English as a second language instructors
Water and wastewater treatment plant and system operators
Bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists
Forest and conservation technicians
Biological technicians
Athletic trainers
Substance abuse, behavioral disorder, and mental health counselors
Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses
Credit counselors
Environmental science and protection technicians, including health
Farm and home management educators
Traffic technicians
Counselors, all other
Museum technicians and conservators
Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers
Broadcast technicians
Educational instruction and library workers, all other
Payroll and timekeeping clerks
Self-enrichment teachers
Agricultural inspectors
Medical dosimetrists, medical records specialists, and health technologists and technicians, all other
Recreational therapists
First-line supervisors of retail sales workers
Agricultural and food science technicians
Tutors and teachers and instructors, all other
Child, family, and school social workers
Eligibility interviewers, government programs
Exercise trainers and group fitness instructors
Painters, construction and maintenance
Community and social service specialists, all other
Correctional officers and jailers
Community health workers
Coaches and scouts
Insurance claims and policy processing clerks
Installation, maintenance, and repair workers, all other
First-line supervisors of housekeeping and janitorial workers
Procurement clerks
Locksmiths and safe repairers
First-line supervisors of personal service and entertainment and recreation workers, except gambling services
Dispatchers, except police, fire, and ambulance
Information and record clerks, all other
Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks
Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists
Human resources assistants, except payroll and timekeeping
Highway maintenance workers
Maintenance and repair workers, general
Construction laborers
Word processors and typists
Public safety telecommunicators
Office and administrative support workers, all other
Dental assistants
Billing and posting clerks
Teaching assistants, postsecondary
Light truck drivers
Medical equipment preparers
Bus drivers, transit and intercity
Bill and account collectors
Secretaries and administrative assistants, except legal, medical, and executive
Printing press operators
Healthcare support workers, all other
Firefighters
Industrial truck and tractor operators
Medical secretaries and administrative assistants
Rehabilitation counselors
Emergency medical technicians and paramedics
Customer service representatives
Motor vehicle operators, all other
Office clerks, general
First-line supervisors of food preparation and serving workers
Veterinary technologists and technicians
Interviewers, except eligibility and loan
Phlebotomists
Shipping, receiving, and inventory clerks
Medical assistants
School bus monitors and protective service workers, all other
Social and human service assistants
Forest and conservation workers
Pharmacy technicians
Data entry keyers
File clerks
Psychiatric technicians
Security guards
Passenger vehicle drivers, except bus drivers, transit and intercity
Switchboard operators, including answering service
Laborers and freight, stock, and material movers, hand
Landscaping and groundskeeping workers
Preschool teachers, except special education
Helpers–installation, maintenance, and repair workers
Mail clerks and mail machine operators, except postal service
Residential advisors
Receptionists and information clerks
Dietetic technicians
Tour and travel guides
Psychiatric aides
Nursing assistants
Orderlies
Library assistants, clerical
Substitute teachers, short-term
Stockers and order fillers
Veterinary assistants and laboratory animal caretakers
Recreation workers
Cooks, institution and cafeteria
Farmworkers, farm, ranch, and aquacultural animals
Crematory operators and personal care and service workers, all other
Janitors and cleaners, except maids and housekeeping cleaners
Physical therapist aides
Teaching assistants, except postsecondary
Animal caretakers
Home health and personal care aides
Maids and housekeeping cleaners
Parking attendants
Food preparation and serving related workers, all other
Food servers, nonrestaurant
Food preparation workers
Ushers, lobby attendants, and ticket takers
Laundry and dry-cleaning workers
Dining room and cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers
Childcare workers
Cashiers
Amusement and recreation attendants
Lifeguards, ski patrol, and other recreational protective service workers
Fast food and counter workers
Compared with the private sector, state government showed evidence of a more compressed wage structure, with higher wages for lower paying occupations and lower wages for higher paying ones. In May 2020, 121 of the 330 occupations with 1,000 or more jobs in both the private sector and state government had significantly higher wages in state government. Among lower paying occupations (annual mean wages of $50,000 or less in the private sector), 77 out of 113 paid significantly more in state government. However, among higher paying occupations (annual mean wages of $100,000 or more in the private sector), 53 out of 60 paid significantly less in state government, and none paid significantly more. Local government wages showed a similar, but less pronounced pattern.
Education and childcare administrators, preschool and daycare
Education administrators, kindergarten through secondary
Preschool teachers, except special education
Kindergarten teachers, except special education
Elementary school teachers, except special education
Middle school teachers, except special and career/technical education
Career/technical education teachers, middle school
Secondary school teachers, except special and career/technical education
Career/technical education teachers, secondary school
Special education teachers, preschool
Special education teachers, kindergarten and elementary school
Special education teachers, middle school
Special education teachers, secondary school
Substitute teachers, short-term
Teaching assistants, except postsecondary
Local government and private sector wages differed only slightly overall in the educational instruction and library group in May 2020. Local government had higher mean wages, however, for most education administrator and teaching occupations at the preschool through secondary school levels. For example, preschool teachers, except special education, earned an average of $19,320 more in local government than in the private sector, and elementary school teachers, except special education, earned an average of $11,900 more. Differences between local government and private sector wages were not appreciably different for secondary school career/technical education teachers, preschool special education teachers, or middle school special education teachers.
Education administrators, postsecondary
Business teachers, postsecondary
Math and computer science teachers, postsecondary
Engineering and architecture teachers, postsecondary
Life sciences teachers, postsecondary
Physical sciences teachers, postsecondary
Social sciences teachers, postsecondary
Health teachers, postsecondary
Education and library science teachers, postsecondary
Law, criminal justice, and social work teachers, postsecondary
Arts, communications, history, and humanities teachers, postsecondary
Teaching assistants, postsecondary
Although preschool through secondary teaching occupations generally earned less in the private sector, the picture is different at the postsecondary level. Postsecondary teaching assistants and most types of postsecondary teachers had lower mean wages in state government than in the private sector. For example, law, criminal justice, and social work postsecondary teachers earned an average of $24,800 less in state government than in the private sector in May 2020. This is partly because state government had significantly lower wages for both law teachers and social work teachers, and partly because state government had a lower share of law teachers, the highest paying of these occupations.
In local government, the differences in annual mean wages for postsecondary teachers were more varied. For example, postsecondary health specialties teachers earned $21,270 less on average in local government as compared with the private sector, but postsecondary education and library science teachers earned $22,410 more.
No formal educational credential
High school diploma or equivalent
Some college, no degree
Postsecondary nondegree award
Associate’s degree
Bachelor’s degree
Master’s degree
Doctoral or professional degree
Occupations typically requiring postsecondary education for entry made up over 63 percent of state government and 61 percent of local government employment, compared with 35 percent of private sector employment in May 2020. Occupations typically requiring a bachelor’s degree for entry made up a higher employment share in both state government (34.1 percent) and local government (38.9 percent) than in the private sector (20.9 percent). This category includes teachers at the kindergarten through secondary levels, which are concentrated in local government. In state government, 15.4 percent of employment consisted of occupations typically requiring a doctoral or professional degree for entry, reflecting in part the high concentration of postsecondary teachers in state government.
Occupations typically requiring no formal educational credential for entry, such as cashiers and fast food and counter workers, made up a quarter of private sector jobs, but only 4 percent of state government and 10 percent of local government employment.
Doctoral or professional degree
Master’s degree
Bachelor’s degree
Associate’s degree
Postsecondary nondegree award
Some college, no degree
High school diploma or equivalent
No formal educational credential
For occupations typically requiring an associate’s degree or higher for entry, average wages were lower in state and local government than in the private sector. This reflects differences in the occupational mix within each education category, as well as wage differences for specific occupations. For example, occupations typically requiring a doctoral or professional degree for entry paid $51,930 less on average in state government than in the private sector in May 2020, and $43,780 less in local government as compared with the private sector. Within this education category, state and local government had higher shares of postsecondary teachers and lower shares of dentists, physicians, and surgeons.
For occupations typically requiring less than an associate’s degree for entry, state and local government had higher mean wages than the private sector—with one exception. Among occupations typically requiring some college, but no degree, local government wages were $11,720 lower than wages in the private sector on average. Teaching assistants, except postsecondary—the lowest paying occupation in this educational category—represented 86 percent of local government jobs in this category, compared with 11 percent in the private sector.
Private sector
State government
Local government
State government had a higher share of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) occupations than the private sector, and local government had a lower share. STEM occupations made up about 7 percent of private sector employment in May 2020, compared with nearly 12 percent of state government employment and less than 3 percent of local government employment.
Computer occupations
Engineers
Drafters, engineering technicians, and mapping technicians
Life and physical scientists
STEM-related postsecondary teachers
Other STEM
In addition to having different overall STEM shares, each ownership had varying mixes of STEM jobs. In May 2020, computer occupations made up a higher share of STEM jobs in the private sector (49.2 percent) and local government (44.6 percent) than in state government (28.4 percent). STEM-related postsecondary teachers accounted for 22.9 percent of STEM jobs in state government and 12.3 percent in local government, compared with less than 1 percent in the private sector. Life and physical scientists made up 16.2 percent of state government STEM employment, compared with 7.6 percent of STEM jobs in local government and 4.8 percent in the private sector.
Audrey Watson is an economist in the Division of Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics, U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Email: watson.audrey@bls.gov.
This Spotlight on Statistics uses May 2020 estimates by public/private ownership from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics (OEWS) program. OEWS estimates are published annually and measure occupational employment and wage rates for wage and salary workers in nonfarm establishments in the United States. The survey does not include the self-employed and owners, partners, and proprietors of unincorporated businesses. More information about the survey is available in the frequently asked questions, technical notes, and Handbook of Methods chapter. National occupational employment and wage estimates by ownership are available from the main OEWS data page.
Because of the OEWS survey methodology, the May 2020 OEWS estimates do not fully reflect the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Private sector and most local government data used in the May 2020 estimates were collected in six semiannual survey panels for May 2020, November 2019, May 2019, November 2018, May 2018, and November 2017. Data for state government and Hawaii’s local government, except for schools and hospitals, are based on a November 2019 census. A census of public- and private-owned hospitals is taken over a 3-year period. For more information, see the OEWS COVID-19 impact statement.
This Spotlight uses unpublished special tabulations of OEWS private, state government, and local government data by typical entry-level educational requirement and for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) occupations. Data by typical entry-level educational requirement are based on education and training categories assigned to each occupation by the BLS Employment Projections program. A downloadable Excel file of May 2020 OEWS data by typical entry-level educational requirement for all ownerships combined, including a list of the typical entry-level educational requirements assigned to each occupation, is available from the additional OEWS data sets page.
“STEM” is defined in this Spotlight to consist of 98 occupations, including computer and mathematical, architecture and engineering, and life and physical science occupations; managerial and postsecondary teaching occupations related to these functional areas; and sales occupations requiring scientific or technical knowledge at the postsecondary level. A downloadable XLSX spreadsheet with May 2020 OEWS STEM data for all ownerships combined, including a list of occupations in the STEM definition, is available from the additional OEWS data sets page. This is only one of many possible definitions of STEM. The Standard Occupational Classification Policy Committee has provided guidance on options for defining STEM under the 2018 SOC.
March 2020–March 2021 job losses represent 12-month national employment changes, not seasonally adjusted, from the BLS Current Employment Statistics program.

source

Leave a Comment